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  #1201  
Old 12-20-2011, 04:52 PM
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Exclamation Man cuts off teenage wife's lips and nose; police refuse to register a case

Pakistan: Man cuts off teenage wife's lips and nose; police refuse to register a case against him


http://www.jihadwatch.org/2011/12/pa...ainst-him.html


As this story notes, resistance to stronger legislation against domestic violence has come from "religious parties" -- that is, those who will tolerate no limitations on the reach of Islamic law. Moving against domestic violence threatens to criminalize what Allah made lawful: the principle that a man can hit (yes, hit) a woman in his household from whom he fears disobedience (Qur'an 4:34).

Does the Qur'an say to disfigure one's wife with a razor? No. But this case is a consequence of the culture of tolerance toward and defense of domestic violence: the husband clearly felt he was justified in this act, and liked his odds of getting away with it.

Most tellingly, if he were simply hitting his wife, it would not have made the news. "Man chops off wife's nose and lips," from Agence France-Presse, December 19:
A teenage Pakistani woman on Monday told of her terror as her husband chopped off her nose and lips in a furious marital row, and threatened to kill herself unless the police brought him to justice.
The horrifying case underscores the brutal violence suffered by some women in Pakistan, where a domestic violence bill lapsed in 2009 after being held up in the Senate due to objections from religious parties.
Salma Bibi, 17, said her husband, 22-year-old Ghulam Qadir, subjected her to a beating, then bound her hands and feet with rope and hacked into her face with a razor in a remote village in the southwestern province Baluchistan.
"He repeatedly slapped my face and then went into the room and brought with him a locally made, sharp razor," she told AFP, speaking Baluchi in remarks translated by her uncle from a hospital bed in central Multan city.
"I started shouting in panic. He tied my hands and foot with a rope and chopped off my nose and lips," she added.
The teenager said police refused to register a case when her family complained about the attack, and threatened to kill herself without justice.
"I want justice and if it is not delivered to me, I will immolate myself in front of the Supreme Court.
"I will not sit in peace until my husband is brought to justice and gets punishment for the crime he committed," she added.
Ghulam and Salma married last year and live in the village of Karkana, 475 kilometres (300 miles) southwest of Islamabad.
Local officials insisted they were searching for Ghulam and would arrest him when caught.
"They often had quarrels as the girl used to spend more time with her parents," said Nadir Khan, an administration official in Musa Khel district, part of violence-torn Baluchistan, which borders Afghanistan and Iran.
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani has demanded action in the case, but many cases of violence against women in Pakistan go unpunished.
Human rights groups say Pakistani women suffer severe discrimination and widespread domestic violence, including so-called "honour" killings when a victim is murdered for allegedly bringing dishonour on her family.
Ali Dayan Hasan, Pakistan director at Human Rights Watch, told AFP that domestic violence is a "serious, endemic problem in Pakistan" and called on the government to revive efforts to outlaw domestic violence.
But he praised the current parliament for a "fairly impressive" record on passing other legislation designed to protect women's rights....
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  #1202  
Old 12-21-2011, 03:56 PM
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Exclamation Pakistan: 675 "honor killings" in the first nine months of 2011

Pakistan:
675 "honor killings" in the first nine months of 2011

http://news.yahoo.com/675-pakistan-h...190252970.html

http://www.jihadwatch.org/2011/12/pa...s-of-2011.html


They're working hard in Pakistan to ensure the Muslim world doesn't slip from being responsible 91 percent of honor killings worldwide.

As this report notes, there is no law against domestic violence. Such legislation stalled out in the assembly in 2009 with resistance on Islamic grounds. It would run the risk of prohibiting something Allah made lawful: hitting (yes, hitting) "disobedient" women (Qur'an 4:34).

Islamic law is also inconsistent at best on whether parents face any penalty for killing their children. The relatives carrying out the killings clearly feel they are justified in what they are doing, and are confident they will not only avoid severe penalties, but earn respect for their brutality.

Behavior that is rewarded tends to be repeated. "675 Pakistan 'honour killing' victims: commission," from Agence France-Presse, December 20:
At least 675 Pakistani women and girls were murdered during the first nine months of the year for allegedly defaming their family's honour, a leading human rights group said Tuesday.
The statistics highlight the scale of violence suffered by many women in conservative Muslim Pakistan, where they are frequently treated as second-class citizens and there is no law against domestic violence.
Despite some progress on better protecting women's rights, activists say the government needs to do far more to prosecute murderers in cases largely dismissed by police as private, family affairs.
"A total of 675 women and girls were killed in the name of honour across Pakistan from January to September," a senior official in the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan told AFP.
They included at least 71 victims under the age of 18.
The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is unauthorised to speak to the media, said figures were still being compiled from October to December, and that a full report would be released in February.
The Commission reported 791 honour killings in 2010 and there was no discernible decrease this year, the official added.
Around 450 of the women killed from January to September were accused of having "illicit relations" and 129 of marrying without permission.
Some victims were raped or gangraped before being killed, he said. At least 19 were killed by their sons, 49 by their fathers and 169 by their husbands.
Rights groups say the government should do more to ensure that women subject to violence, harassment and discrimination have effective access to justice.
Ali Dayan Hasan, Pakistan director at Human Rights Watch, told AFP that the state's inability to enforce rule of law, leaving matters in the hands of tribesmen and local elders, was a major factor.
"We have a system in Pakistan where the state and judicial recourse are absent and the vacuum is filled by local elders," he said.
"A combination of legal reforms, exercise of administrative authority and social awareness can greatly help check the honour killings," he added.
Earlier this month, a Belgian court sentenced four members of a Pakistani family to prison for the murder of their daughter and sister, who defied them by living with a Belgian man and refusing an arranged marriage.
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  #1203  
Old 12-22-2011, 10:32 AM
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Default Honor Killings On The Rise In Pakistan

http://origin.rferl.org/content/hono.../24429491.html


Quote:

The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan believes that violence against women in the country is increasing.

By Abubakar Siddique
December 21, 2011

Pakistan has taken steps to counter the troubling rise of "honor killings," but recently enacted laws were not enough to save 675 women.

That is the number of women who died in honor killings in the first nine months of 2011, according to Pakistan's leading human-rights watchdog, putting the county on track to exceed the record number of such killings recorded in 2010.

The troubling figures were released on December 20 by the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP), which documented 791 honor killings in 2010 and 600 in 2009.

Zaman Khan, a senior HRCP monitor speaking from the eastern city of Lahore, claims the numbers indicate that violence against women is increasing.

"The [new] unfortunate trend is that the traditions that used to exist in conservative rural areas or feudal and tribal communities have now slowly made inroads into the cities," he says. "Despite the [public] awareness and women's role in public life, the atrocities and violence against them have increased."

Just this month, Pakistan took steps to counter the trend. New laws were passed that establish severe punishments for perpetrators of violence against women, and discriminatory practices such as forced marriage or depriving women of inheritance were banned.

Human rights activists have welcomed the moves, but still maintain that compliance with these laws is a long way off.

Some Positive Developments

The HRCP's Khan notes some positive developments. He believes the media's reporting of such cases has increased, adding to public awareness of the issue.

And police, he suggests, appear to be increasingly documenting and investigating cases of violence against women -- a break from past practice when such cases were brushed aside in the name of protecting a family's honor.

Nonetheless, Khan also notes that as startling as the current figures are, they may be low.

This is because many cases never come to light as HRCP monitors and journalists cannot access remote regions in the country of 180 million people.

Khan claims conservative societal norms still favor the concealment of such incidents.

"The first thing is the culture here," he says People have a mindset and they are against women and even do not recognize their rights inside their home or outside in society. Then there are the attitudes: that of the police, the courts; and even individual attitudes inside our homes.

"We have [favored] treatment for boys compared to girls. In addition, religious extremism definitely plays a role."

HRCP's research shows that, out of the 675 women who died in honor killings this year, 71 were younger than 18.

More than half of the 791 victims in 2010 were killed over allegations of illicit sexual relations. Another 129 were killed because they had married without their family's consent.

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  #1204  
Old 12-26-2011, 03:01 PM
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Exclamation Father Beats Daughter to Death for Dating Outside Islam

Father Beats Daughter to Death for Dating Outside Islam




Sun, Dec 25, 2011, 11:35 am SL Time, ColomboPage News Desk, Sri Lanka.

Dec 25, Colombo: A Muslim extremist style killing has been reported from Sammanthurai of Ampara district of Sri Lanka's Eastern Province, police say.

According to the police, a Muslim father has allegedly beaten his underage daughter to death yesterday evening.

The 17-year-old daughter was killed by father allegedly for having a relationship with a person belonged to another religion.

The suspect has been arrested by police.

Samanthurai Police have commenced further investigations into the incident.

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  #1205  
Old 12-27-2011, 04:06 PM
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Arrow Man Fails to Win Girl's Heart - Throws Acid on Her Instead

Man Fails to Win Girl's Heart - Throws Acid on Her Instead
KARACHI: While the Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill 2010 still awaits the approval of the president, two more young women became the victims of acid throwing in Surjani Town on Sunday.
According to DSP Abdul Fateh Sangri, the offender, identified as Kamran, threw acid on teenage girls, Zarin and Erum, at Erum’s house in Sector 5 D. They were taken to the burns ward of the Civil hospital. Zarin was treated and sent home while Erum, who was received more burns, will take at least 40 days to recover, after which she will undergo a surgery, according to Dr Dabeerur Rehman, the ward in charge.

According to Zarin’s family, the incident occurred when they went to Surjani Town – their old neighborhood for a visit.

“On our way we suspected that someone was following us,” said Zarin’s grandfather, Islamuddin. “So we got off at Erum’s house first because it was the nearest.” He said that the family had been sitting inside for a short while when there was a knock at the door. “Both the girls went to open the gate,” said the grandfather. “As soon as they opened the gate, Kamran threw acid on them and ran away.”

The intended target was Zarin, but Erum received most of the burns because she tried to stop Kamran by holding his hand and protect her friend.

Senior medico-legal officer, Dr Aftab Channar said that Erum sustained 25 per cent burns while Zarin sustained 15 per cent. Both the girls’ faces and foreheads were also affected.

Islamuddin said that Kamran, who also lived in the same neighbourhood as Erum, wanted to marry Zarin and also sent over marriage proposals twice, but the family refused because “she was still a teenager.”

The family had moved to Ayub Goth, near Sohrab Goth, around 1.5 years ago and had fixed Zarin’s marriage with someone else.

Kamran was picked up by the police on Sunday night. He confessed to the crime, said DSP Fateh Sangri. His defence was that the family compelled him to do it.

“I asked the family for Zarin’s hand in marriage repeatedly,” said Kamran. “But they always refused. Sometimes they would give the excuse of her age, sometimes different sects, and other times they said that she was studying. So, I decided that if she can’t be mine, she cannot be anyone else’s as well.” He insisted that Zarin’s family were equally punishable for the act as he was because they compelled him to act this way.

The police registered an FIR under the Pakistan Penal Code on Zarin’s request. The police said that they believed that Kamran had an accomplice. “He came in a rickshaw,” said DSP Sangri. “We are trying to find out who his aide was. We will present him to court after we arrest him.”

According to Sangri, the Acid Control and Acid Crime Prevention Bill, passed by the parliament this year, calls for a prison term from 14 years to life imprisonment and fines of up to Rs1 million for the perpetrator of the crime.

Published in The Express Tribune, December 27th, 2011.
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  #1206  
Old 12-29-2011, 12:50 AM
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Exclamation Somalia: "Alarming increase" in women and girls who have been raped as spoils of war

Somalia: "Alarming increase" in women and girls who have been raped as spoils of war


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/28/wo...agewanted=1&hp

http://www.jihadwatch.org/2011/12/so...ls-of-war.html


The Qur'an sanctions sex with captive and slave women: "And all married women (are forbidden unto you) save those (captives) whom your right hands possess. It is a decree of Allah for you" (4:24). Al-Shabaab is acting barbarically, but as far as they are concerned, they are acting within their rights and not forbidding what Allah has made lawful. They are not at all alone among Muslims in endorsing or engaging in this behavior.


"For Somali Women, Pain of Being a Spoil of War," by Jeffrey Gettleman for the New York Times, December 28:
MOGADISHU, Somalia — The girl’s voice dropped to a hush as she remembered the bright, sunny afternoon when she stepped out of her hut and saw her best friend buried in the sand, up to her neck.
Her friend had made the mistake of refusing to marry a Shabab commander. Now she was about to get her head bashed in, rock by rock.
“You’re next,” the Shabab warned the girl, a frail 17-year-old who was living with her brother in a squalid refugee camp.
Several months later, the men came back. Five militants burst into her hut, pinned her down and gang-raped her, she said. They claimed to be on a jihad, or holy war, and any resistance was considered a crime against Islam, punishable by death.
“I’ve had some very bad dreams about these men,” she said, having recently escaped the area they control. “I don’t know what religion they are.”
Somalia has been steadily worn down by decades of conflict and chaos, its cities in ruins and its people starving. Just this year, tens of thousands have died from famine, with countless others cut down in relentless combat. Now Somalis face yet another widespread terror: an alarming increase in rapes and sexual abuse of women and girls.
The Shabab militant group, which presents itself as a morally righteous rebel force and the defender of pure Islam, is seizing women and girls as spoils of war, gang-raping and abusing them as part of its reign of terror in southern Somalia, according to victims, aid workers and United Nations officials. Short of cash and losing ground, the militants are also forcing families to hand over girls for arranged marriages that often last no more than a few weeks and are essentially sexual slavery, a cheap way to bolster their ranks’ flagging morale. [...]
Somalia is a deeply traditional place, where 98 percent of girls are subject to genital cutting, according to United Nations figures. Most girls are illiterate and relegated to their homes. When they venture out, it is usually to work, trudging through the rubble-strewn alleyways wrapped head to toe in thick black cloth, often lugging something on their back, the equatorial sun burning down on them. [...]
At the same time, aid workers and United Nations officials say the Shabab, who are fighting Somalia’s transitional government and imposing a harsh version of Islam in the areas they control, can no longer pay their several thousand fighters the way they used to. Much as they seize crops and livestock, giving their militants what they call “temporary wives” is how the Shabab keep many young men fighting for them.
But these are hardly marriages, said Sheik Mohamed Farah Ali, a former Shabab commander who defected to the government army.
“There’s no cleric, no ceremony, nothing,” he said, adding that Shabab fighters had even paired up with thin little girls as young as 12, who are left torn and incontinent afterward. If a girl refuses, he said, “she’s killed by stones or bullets.” [...]
“You have no idea how difficult it is for them to come forward,” she said. “There’s no justice here, no protection. People say, ‘You’re junk’ if you’ve been raped.”...
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  #1207  
Old 12-29-2011, 12:53 AM
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Arrow Moderation! Iran may hang, not stone woman convicted of adultery

Moderation! Iran may hang, not stone woman convicted of adultery

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/12...tional-outcry/

http://www.jihadwatch.org/2011/12/mo...-adultery.html


After all, the only thing the label of "moderate" guarantees is that one is somehow less "extreme" than the next guy. Still, according to this report, even this decision is a logistical one. The prison lacks the facilities to carry out the stoning, they say, though perhaps that claim aims to mollify those who would tolerate no retreat under pressure from the stoning sentence.

But just as fast as this story came out, there was also a denial and claims the official was misquoted. Time will tell.

An update on this story. "Iran Fails to Silence Critics by Changing Woman's Death Sentence From Stoning to Hanging," by Perry Chiaramonte for Fox News, December 28:
Iranian officials, already under fire for sentencing a woman to death by stoning, has done little to diminish international outcry by instead pursuing an execution by hanging.
Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, 44, was convicted back in 2006 for an “illicit relationship outside of marriage” and sentenced to death by stoning. The execution was delayed after protests across the globe, and Ashtiani has been detained in prison ever since.
On Sunday, the head judiciary, Malek Ajdar Sharifi said the prison does not have the “necessary facilities” to carry forth with the stoning and that they are considering hanging as an alternative.
Sharifi told the Isna News Agency that an investigation is being conducted to see if it is legally and religiously possible to execute Ashtiani by hanging and that once a determination is made, the sentence will be carried out...
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  #1208  
Old 12-29-2011, 03:22 AM
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Arrow 15-Year-Old Wife Locked in Bathroom for 5 Months

15-Year-Old Wife Locked in Bathroom for 5 Months




Afghan police have rescued a teenage girl who was beaten and locked up in a lavatory for over five months after she defied her in-laws who tried to force her into prostitution, officials said on Tuesday.

Sahar Gul, 15, was found in the basement of her husband's house in northeastern Baghlan province late on Monday after her parents reported her disappearance to the police.

"She was beaten, her fingernails were removed and her arm was broken," district police chief Fazel Rahman told AFP.

Three women including the teenager's mother in-law had been arrested in connection with the case but her husband had fled the area, he added.

The case highlights how women continue to suffer in Afghanistan despite the billions of pounds of international aid which has poured into the country during the decade-long war.

"The 15-year-old girl was brought to hospital with severe shock," said Pul-i-Khurmeri hospital chief Dr Gul Mohammad Wardak.

"She had injuries to her legs and face and the nails on her left had been removed."

Sahar Gul was married to her husband seven months ago in the neighbouring province of Badakhshan, but she was brought to Baghlan to live with her husband, said Rahima Zareefi, the provincial head of women affairs.

During this time her parents were unable to contact her, she said.

The Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission logged 1,026 cases of violence against women in the second quarter of 2011 compared with 2,700 cases for the whole of 2010.

And according to figures in an Oxfam report in October, 87 per cent of Afghan women report having experienced physical, sexual or psychological violence or forced marriage.

Sahar Gul's case comes after a woman known as Gulnaz was pardoned and released earlier this month after spending two years in prison for "moral crimes".

She was jailed after she reported to police that her cousin's husband had raped her. Gulnaz gave birth to the rapist's child in prison.

Last month, the United Nations said that a landmark law aiming to protect women against violence in Afghanistan had been used to prosecute just over 100 cases since being enacted two years ago.

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  #1209  
Old 12-29-2011, 05:19 PM
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Exclamation Oslo: Immigrant Families Account for 70% of Domestic Violence

Oslo: Immigrant Families Account for 70% of Domestic Violence






Our Norwegian correspondent The Observer sends the following report about the disproportionate increase of domestic violence among the “New Norwegians” in Oslo. Stranger rape is no longer the only crime dominated by the culture enrichers; now domestic violence can be added to the list.

The Observer includes this note:
This article was published a couple of weeks ago, and it deals with the domestic abuse of women in Norway. It turns out that 70 percent of the women thus affected in Oslo have a different ethnic background than that of the majority populace.

When you take the official numbers from the various assault rapes statistics committed in Oslo and then compare them with these latest numbers, things start to become quite obvious.
His translation from Nettavisen:
Ethnics account for 70 percent of family violence in Oslo

According to domestic violence coordinator Stein Erik Olsen, families with different ethnic backgrounds are over-represented in the domestic violence statistics.

Nettavisen had intended to write an article about the Norwegian Christmas holiday, Christmas dinners, Christmas beer, Christmas Aquavit and Christmas brawls in Norwegian households.

The hypothesis was that the number of incidences of domestic violence would increase when people have time off and when they consume more alcohol.

That’s not the case in Oslo. According to the domestic violence coordinator and assistant police chief Stein Erik Olsen the ‘Norwegian Christmas violence theory’ is simply a myth, on par with the myth that more burglaries are committed during holidays.

“70 percent of domestic violence cases involve families with a different ethnic background. The cultures concerned don’t touch alcohol and they don’t celebrate Christmas.”

And he adds:
“Our experience from Stovner [immigrant suburb of Oslo] is that the number of domestic violence cases declines during Ramadan.”

Olsen doesn’t wish to speculate why that is the case.

On the agenda

Almost ten years has passed since the national police directorate decided to increase its focus on domestic violence. Every police precinct in Norway now has a domestic violence coordinator. What previously used to be treated as domestic disturbances are now being thoroughly investigated with the aim of a possible conviction as the end result.

In 2005 a new domestic violence law was introduced. Paragraph 219 replaced the old guidelines regarding violence and threats, and more severe penalties were introduced for domestic violence.

The aim is not to get a reduction

The number of cases that end up in the Oslo City Court shows that this new emphasis has borne fruit. The number of domestic violence cases reported has increased from 633 in 2008 to 932 as of December 1, 2011.

Numbers from the National Police Directorate show a 168 percent increase in breaches of paragraph 219 in the period between 2007 and 2011.

“Our aim is not to get a reduction in these cases. There are probably more victims out there that need our help. Our aim is to uncover and combat domestic violence. Lower numbers in this instance would tend to indicate that the police are less successful and that we are less active in our work to uncover this type of violence.” The police chief assistant is also the leader of investigations at Stovner Police station. He confirms that more victims of domestic violence are coming forward and contacting the police.

He says that one of the biggest challenges the police are facing when confronted with other cultures is that they have different laws and different views on women than what is the norm in Norway.

“In some of the more extreme cases we get an insight into the amount of control the family have over these women, and how values totally at odds with Norwegian values are applied. But we have also increased our knowledge as a result of these cases, and not all the women affected are willing to tolerate this kind of treatment. But for many it’s extremely hard to contact the police. To report these incidents means having to completely sever ties with people who are their only reference points in a foreign land,” says Olsen.

More trust in the police

In the last couple of years more people have begun to contact the police. Olsen interprets this as a sign that more people are starting to trust the police and that the numbers of unreported cases are declining.

“When these women see that the police are prioritising their cases, and that society doesn’t tolerate it, more victims will come forward and contact the police.”

The spokesperson for the refuge for women in Fredrikstad, Kari Næss Omvik agrees with Olsen’s assertion that the police are beginning to gain more trust in these cases.

“We have a good relationship with the police. Our impression is that they have become more helpful and that they have started to listen more to the victims,” she says.

But even though society rejects domestic violence, it’s still difficult for the victims to comprehend what’s happening to them, and to break free from the spiral of violence.

http://gatesofvienna.blogspot.com/20...-violence.html
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The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
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  #1210  
Old 12-29-2011, 05:24 PM
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Exclamation Oslo: Immigrant Families Account for 70% of Domestic Violence

Oslo: Immigrant Families Account for 70% of Domestic Violence






Our Norwegian correspondent The Observer sends the following report about the disproportionate increase of domestic violence among the “New Norwegians” in Oslo. Stranger rape is no longer the only crime dominated by the culture enrichers; now domestic violence can be added to the list.

The Observer includes this note:
This article was published a couple of weeks ago, and it deals with the domestic abuse of women in Norway. It turns out that 70 percent of the women thus affected in Oslo have a different ethnic background than that of the majority populace.

When you take the official numbers from the various assault rapes statistics committed in Oslo and then compare them with these latest numbers, things start to become quite obvious.
His translation from Nettavisen:
Ethnics account for 70 percent of family violence in Oslo

According to domestic violence coordinator Stein Erik Olsen, families with different ethnic backgrounds are over-represented in the domestic violence statistics.

Nettavisen had intended to write an article about the Norwegian Christmas holiday, Christmas dinners, Christmas beer, Christmas Aquavit and Christmas brawls in Norwegian households.

The hypothesis was that the number of incidences of domestic violence would increase when people have time off and when they consume more alcohol.

That’s not the case in Oslo. According to the domestic violence coordinator and assistant police chief Stein Erik Olsen the ‘Norwegian Christmas violence theory’ is simply a myth, on par with the myth that more burglaries are committed during holidays.

“70 percent of domestic violence cases involve families with a different ethnic background. The cultures concerned don’t touch alcohol and they don’t celebrate Christmas.”

And he adds:
“Our experience from Stovner [immigrant suburb of Oslo] is that the number of domestic violence cases declines during Ramadan.”

Olsen doesn’t wish to speculate why that is the case.

On the agenda

Almost ten years has passed since the national police directorate decided to increase its focus on domestic violence. Every police precinct in Norway now has a domestic violence coordinator. What previously used to be treated as domestic disturbances are now being thoroughly investigated with the aim of a possible conviction as the end result.

In 2005 a new domestic violence law was introduced. Paragraph 219 replaced the old guidelines regarding violence and threats, and more severe penalties were introduced for domestic violence.

The aim is not to get a reduction

The number of cases that end up in the Oslo City Court shows that this new emphasis has borne fruit. The number of domestic violence cases reported has increased from 633 in 2008 to 932 as of December 1, 2011.

Numbers from the National Police Directorate show a 168 percent increase in breaches of paragraph 219 in the period between 2007 and 2011.

“Our aim is not to get a reduction in these cases. There are probably more victims out there that need our help. Our aim is to uncover and combat domestic violence. Lower numbers in this instance would tend to indicate that the police are less successful and that we are less active in our work to uncover this type of violence.” The police chief assistant is also the leader of investigations at Stovner Police station. He confirms that more victims of domestic violence are coming forward and contacting the police.

He says that one of the biggest challenges the police are facing when confronted with other cultures is that they have different laws and different views on women than what is the norm in Norway.

“In some of the more extreme cases we get an insight into the amount of control the family have over these women, and how values totally at odds with Norwegian values are applied. But we have also increased our knowledge as a result of these cases, and not all the women affected are willing to tolerate this kind of treatment. But for many it’s extremely hard to contact the police. To report these incidents means having to completely sever ties with people who are their only reference points in a foreign land,” says Olsen.

More trust in the police

In the last couple of years more people have begun to contact the police. Olsen interprets this as a sign that more people are starting to trust the police and that the numbers of unreported cases are declining.

“When these women see that the police are prioritising their cases, and that society doesn’t tolerate it, more victims will come forward and contact the police.”

The spokesperson for the refuge for women in Fredrikstad, Kari Næss Omvik agrees with Olsen’s assertion that the police are beginning to gain more trust in these cases.

“We have a good relationship with the police. Our impression is that they have become more helpful and that they have started to listen more to the victims,” she says.

But even though society rejects domestic violence, it’s still difficult for the victims to comprehend what’s happening to them, and to break free from the spiral of violence.

http://gatesofvienna.blogspot.com/20...-violence.html
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Old 12-31-2011, 08:04 PM
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Arrow Child Birde Tortured by In Laws in Afghanistan

Child Birde Tortured by In Laws in Afghanistan


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Old 01-01-2012, 10:56 PM
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Default Honor killing in Grapevine Texas?

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/was-...honor-killing/


Crime Was the Santa Claus Killer‘s Christmas Day Massacre an ’Honor Killing?’

Posted on December 28, 2011 at 9:06am by Billy Hallowell

Motive can be a tough element to pinpoint, especially when there are few details left behind in a complicated homicide case. On Monday, the Blaze reported on the tragic murderous rampage by a man dressed up as Santa Claus in Grapevine, Texas. Now, some allege that the entire incident was an honor killing.
The murderer, identified as 56-year-old Aziz Yazdanpanah, apparently went to his estranged wife’s apartment dressed in costume and killed six people. Sadly, this included his own children and family members. According to the International Business Times, the victims were (although names have not officially been released by the medical examiner):
…Yazdanpanah’s ex-wife Nasrin Rahmaty (55), daughter Nona Yazdanpanah (19), son Ali Yazdanpanah (15), sister-in-law Zohreh Rahmaty (58), brother-in-law Hossein Zarei (59) and niece Sahra Zarei (22).
Following the incident, Robert Spencer, a well-known author and columnist who runs the web site Jihad Watch, wonders if Yazdanpanah, who was a Muslim, couldn’t handle the fact that his daughter was dating a non-believer. In this potential scenario, Yazdanpanah would have killed the family to avoid any associated dishonor resulting from the relationship. An article published on Jihad Watch reads:
Aziz Yazdanpanah, a Muslim, didn‘t like his daughter’s non-Muslim boyfriend and was exhibiting stalker behavior. [...]

Again and again we have seen honor killings in which fathers kill daughters who are dating non-Muslims or have supposedly besmirched the family honor by some sexual indiscretion. Lt. Todd Dearing says that motive isn’t important — which is generally only the case when Islam is involved.

Initial media reports portrayed a man whose life was in ruins. In 2010, Yazdanpanah filed for bankruptcy and then he and his wife separated earlier this year. Additionally, his home foreclosed. All of these occurrences come with a great deal of stress and isolation. Collectively, it’s entirely possible that the strain from each played a role in his horrendous actions.

In addressing the “honor killing” potential, Jihad Watch quotes Nona Yazdanpanah’s (Yazdanpanah’s daughter) friend, Lacie Reed. The young girl was quoted as saying, “She (Nona) would come to school crying and telling us her dad was crazy. He wouldn’t let her wear certain things. He was always taking her phone away, checking her call history and checking her text messages.”

Reed went on to say that Nona couldn’t date until she was “a certain age” and that she wasn‘t allowed to date anyone outside of the family’s race or religion. In addition to these details, Jihad Watch also claims that Yazdanpanah had installed cameras around the family’s home in an effort to monitor the activities that were going on.

These quotes, in themselves, are not enough to definitively call the murder-suicide an “honor killing.” That being said, the information, should it be true, does cause some questions to emerge.
So far, the Grapevine Police Department has been tight-lipped about the details surrounding the case, so any and all theories regarding motive will have to wait for definitive answering.

“We never really have encountered a situation with this many victims that were shot and killed,” Sgt. Roger Eberling said. “We’re still trying to uncover the background here. This is the worst homicide we’ve ever had.”







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Old 01-02-2012, 07:43 PM
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Arrow Out of Muslim mouths

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Old 01-04-2012, 08:37 AM
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In Sukkur, a separate graveyard for the ‘dishonourable’ ones

By Sarfaraz Memon
Published: January 3, 2012


People at the ‘karan jo qabrustan’ are buried without last rites and men guard the graves so nobody can visit them. DESIGN: SHEHREZAD MAHER

SUKKUR: For some of the deceased in Sindh, there are no prayers for a peaceful afterlife and no on comes to put flowers on their graves. Those slain for honour are not spared even in death.

There is a separate graveyard for those killed under the pretext of karo-kari (honour killing) called ‘karan jo qabrustan’ (graveyard for the dishonoured) near Daharki. At this graveyard, built by the Shar clan, people are buried without last rites and men guard the graves so nobody can visit them and offer Fateha. Even in death, the punishment continues.
While the custom of karo-kari prevails throughout Sindh, some clans as Shar Bozdar, Pitafi and Jakhrani are particularly notorious for killing people under the custom.
Shar Bozdar and Pitafi clans are concentrated mainly in Ghotki and Kashmore, while the Jakhrani tribe is spread in areas over Jacobabad and Kashmore.
In these tribes, the custom of killing in the name of honour flourishes to serve many other ulterior motives. According to dictates of people from the tribes and other smaller communities, men manipulate this atrocious custom to get rid of their wives and marry a lover, to get monetary benefit or share in property among other things.
According to a Sindh-based, women’s rights NGO, Samaj Foundation, the number of women killed in Sindh was 284 in 2009, while in 2010 it fell to 266. The foundation has statistics until June 30 this year, where a total of 155 cases were recorded.
However, according to the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, 675 women and girls were murdered during the first nine months of the year for allegedly defaming their family’s honour.
Kiran Daudpoto, director of Samaj Foundation, has too many unfortunate stories to share. In June 2011, Arzana, a young widow, was killed and buried in her courtyard by her father-in-law and brother-in -law who wanted to sell her to an elderly man.
In another incident four years ago, 82-year-old Mai Bhagul was branded kari by her son who had used up her savings for Hajj instead of making arrangements for the pilgrimage. Such stories are many, some more brutal than the rest.
There are various explanations as to how this custom found its way in Sindh. Accounts of historians relate it to the pre-Islamic era.
They say the custom reached the sub-continent in the 17th century when some Arab descendants, who used to bury their daughters alive, came to settle in Balochistan. Killing young and old women in the name of honour was common practice for them. Later, when the British tried to prohibit the custom by announcing the death penalty for the perpetrators, people started throwing women in wells and claiming they were suicide cases. When the authorities discovered that this tactic was being used, poisonous snakes used to kill women instead.
Human rights activist Samar Minallah says the Sardars, elected representatives and influential people are to blame for the practice. “These people can stop such incidents as the decision of declaring people Kari or to barter girls and equal scores rests in the Jirga. But they don’t stand for justice so their voters don’t get angry.”
However, the Sardars of the notorious tribes deny the allegation of their unjust behaviour with women and claim there is a lot of respect for women in their community. MPA Sardar Ahmed Ali of the Pitafi tribe said that if ‘Niayani Mair’ (a group of girls) are taken to warring tribes, the elders cover their heads with Ajrak and immediately agree to burry the hatchet. MPA Sardar Rahim Bux from the Bozdar clan also added that women are always kept out of the way of harm even during tribal feuds. Sardar Himmat Ali Kamariyo representing his communities in Kamariyo, Abro, Jeho and Phul Poto communities also defended Sindhi men. “It is wrong to say that the entire Sindhi community is cruel and involved in crimes against women, there are very few such people giving a bad name to all.”
Study claims men are willing to sell or kill their wives
A pilot study on honour killings by Maliha Zia Lari, an advocate, has revealed that some men are willing to sell off their wives, or kill them in order to get rid of them.
According to the advocate, the 2004 criminal law (amendment) has not had the desired impact. She said that since its implementation, honour killings had actually increased.
Lari carried out a study titled, ‘Honour killings in Pakistan and the compliance of law’ in collaboration with the Aurat Foundation’s legislative watch programme for women empowerment.
She said that the research was conducted in 2010 to find out how the criminal law amendment was being implemented and included police, court and community evaluations. The study was conducted in Ghotki, Gujrat, Naseerabad and Nowshera.
“The highest number of cases were reported from Ghotki,” she said. “The least number of cases were reported from Nowshera. However, most of the incidents in Nowshera are not reported.” She added that the biggest limitation to their study was the lack of consolidated data available.
While studying the FIRs, she said that they were gender insensitive as the police preferred to report such incidents as murder instead of honour killings.
She explained the motive behind the authorities reporting karo kari as murder, and said that the reasons cited for murder were usually considered a negative reference to the woman’s character. Elaborating on her point, she said that these usually included details such as the woman leaving her husband or marrying without her family’s consent. She added that nearly 1,636 honour killings were reported in 2011.
The research also included detailed case studies, which according to Lari were easier to access at the high court than the district courts. She said that the Sindh High Court had a couple of recorded honour killing cases while there were no reported cases in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa or Balochistan. She added that the police did not usually arrest the suspects because of social pressure.
The police perspective
While talking about the authorities attitude towards honour killings, DIG Abdul Khalique Sheikh, said that according to one of their studies nearly 88% of police officers thought that there was no difference between murder and honour killings. He added that for a police officer, karo kari was a family matter.
The DIG said that it investigations for such cases was very problematic as the evidence was hidden and witnesses were unwilling to collaborate.
While talking about the status of an anti-honour killing programme in collaboration with the United Nations, he said that so far they had save 12 girls from getting murdered. He added the date from non-governmental organisations was misleading and exaggerated.
Supreme Court advocate Anwar Mansoor Khan said that many criminals could walk away free because of the option of qisas (blood money) and diyat (financial compensation) in the 2004 criminal law (amendment).
with additional reporting by Rabia Ali
Published in The Express Tribune, January 3rd, 2012.
http://networkedblogs.com/skJMi
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Old 01-04-2012, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paparock View Post
15-Year-Old Wife Locked in Bathroom for 5 Months
Her "husband" is in the ANA, she is being sent to India for treatment.
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Old 01-04-2012, 05:08 PM
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Arrow Child Bride Escaped Torture Only to Be Sent Back

Child Bride Escaped Torture Only to Be Sent Back




A 15-year-old Afghan girl who was nearly tortured to death by her husband and his family attempted to escape from her attackers more than four months ago but was sent back home by local authorities, it has emerged.

Sahar Gul, a child bride married off to a soldier called Gulam Sakhi who then tried to force her into prostitution, is being treated for horrific injuries in a hospital in Kabul after she was rescued last week.

During her ordeal several of her fingernails were ripped out with pliers and one of her ears was badly burned by an iron. Her husband is now on the run, and her mother-in-law and sister-in-law have been arrested.


On the mend ... Sahar Gul, pictured here on December 31. Photo: AFP


Her case has caused uproar in Afghanistan and Hamid Karzai, the country's President, has vowed that those responsible would be punished.
But disturbing new details about how the local community and authorities responded to her abuse has highlighted the ambivalence many Afghans have over how far women should be able to exercise the most basic of legal rights.

"She ran away to her neighbour's house and told them that her husband was trying to make her become a prostitute," said local community leader Ziaulhaq. " 'If you are a Muslim, you must tell the government what is happening to me,' she told them."


Tortured ... Sahar Gul, a 15-year-old Afghan wife, pictured here on December 28. Photo: AP


The locals said they did take the case to the authorities. When the police arrived Sahar's mother-in-law tried to fight them off, screaming all the while that her son had "bought" the girl who therefore had to do what she was told.

She appeared to be alluding to the dowry paid by Sakhi's family, a sum thought to be about $4000.

Locals say the family simply promised to stop hurting her. Ziaulhaq also alleged that bribes were paid to government officials to hush up the affair.

Although she emphatically denied money was paid, Rahima Zarifi, the women's affairs chief in Baghlan province, said she could not remember the details of the case, or why Sahar was sent back home.

The abuse resumed and continued for months until a male relative visited. When he found the girl, who had been starved in a locked basement for weeks, Sahar was almost unable to speak.

Fauzia Kufi, an MP who campaigns on women's issues, said that even then local authorities attempted to resolve the abuse through "traditional means".

"Basically they wanted the relative to sit down with his sister's abusers and work out an agreement," she said.

Kufi also claims there was strong pressure not to publicise the case.
"Many people don't take these sorts of crimes seriously and don't think it should be reported," she said.

"Even the local authorities have blamed the department for women's affairs for not trying to solve it locally between families in the traditional way."

Horrific abuse of women is still common in Afghanistan, particularly against brides who can be regarded as chattels by their husbands or are exchanged between families in order to resolve feuds.

The government is frequently unwilling to enforce laws it has often been forced to pass by the country's international backers, and the writ of the state often does not run in areas far away from urban centres.

However, the case of Sahar was not in the remote countryside but in Puli Khumri, an important, mid-sized town which has one of the country's few factories.

Kufi also claimed that local sources told her that Sakhi, despite having a warrant out for his arrest, returned briefly to his home on Sunday night and that locals did not inform the police.

The claim is strongly denied by community leaders who say they were appalled by the crimes of the family and had never attempted a low-key, traditional mediation between the parties.

Abdullah Fahim, a senior adviser to the minister of public health, said the case was part of the "bitter reality" of Afghanistan.

"We have several cases like this, especially in remote parts of the country where there is not a strong attitude to women's rights," he said. He added that the ministry had dedicated a team of psychiatrists to the girl.

"Her physical wounds are getting better day by day, but we are very concerned about her mental condition because she has been tortured for a long period of time."

The law on the elimination of violence against women was passed more than two years ago and criminalised many abuses for the first time, including domestic violence and child marriage.

But a recent UN report found only a small percentage of reported crimes against women were pursued by the Afghan government.

Between March 2010 and March 2011, prosecutors opened 594 investigations involving crimes under the law - just 26 per cent of the incidents registered by the Afghan human rights commission.

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Old 01-05-2012, 02:54 PM
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Arrow Tortured 15-year-old Afghan bride was sent back to her husband and in-laws when she t

Tortured 15-year-old Afghan bride was sent back to her husband and in-laws when she tried to flee





"Even the local authorities have blamed the department for women's affairs for not trying to solve it locally between families in the traditional way."

Her other option would probably have been prison. Up to 350 woman and about 114 girls are known to be locked up for "moral crimes" in Afghanistan. Among the girls, "80 per cent are serving sentences for either running away from home or extramarital sex."

As was the case with Gulnaz, the rape victim finally pardoned from a sentence for adultery (after agreeing to marry the man who raped her), there are undoubtedly others like the girl in this story, Sahar Gul, inside and outside of jail.

"Tortured Afghan child bride had been sent back to in-laws," by Jon Boone for the Sydney Morning Herald, January 3:
A 15-year-old Afghan girl who was nearly tortured to death by her husband and his family attempted to escape from her attackers more than four months ago but was sent back home by local authorities, it has emerged.
Sahar Gul, a child bride married off to a soldier called Gulam Sakhi who then tried to force her into prostitution, is being treated for horrific injuries in a hospital in Kabul after she was rescued last week.
During her ordeal several of her fingernails were ripped out with pliers and one of her ears was badly burned by an iron. Her husband is now on the run, and her mother-in-law and sister-in-law have been arrested.
Her case has caused uproar in Afghanistan and Hamid Karzai, the country's President, has vowed that those responsible would be punished.
But disturbing new details about how the local community and authorities responded to her abuse has highlighted the ambivalence many Afghans have over how far women should be able to exercise the most basic of legal rights.
"She ran away to her neighbour's house and told them that her husband was trying to make her become a prostitute," said local community leader Ziaulhaq. " 'If you are a Muslim, you must tell the government what is happening to me,' she told them."
The locals said they did take the case to the authorities. When the police arrived Sahar's mother-in-law tried to fight them off, screaming all the while that her son had "bought" the girl who therefore had to do what she was told.
She appeared to be alluding to the dowry paid by Sakhi's family, a sum thought to be about $4000.
Locals say the family simply promised to stop hurting her. Ziaulhaq also alleged that bribes were paid to government officials to hush up the affair.
Although she emphatically denied money was paid, Rahima Zarifi, the women's affairs chief in Baghlan province, said she could not remember the details of the case, or why Sahar was sent back home.
The abuse resumed and continued for months until a male relative visited. When he found the girl, who had been starved in a locked basement for weeks, Sahar was almost unable to speak.
Fauzia Kufi, an MP who campaigns on women's issues, said that even then local authorities attempted to resolve the abuse through "traditional means".
"Basically they wanted the relative to sit down with his sister's abusers and work out an agreement," she said.
Kufi also claims there was strong pressure not to publicise the case.
"Many people don't take these sorts of crimes seriously and don't think it should be reported," she said.
"Even the local authorities have blamed the department for women's affairs for not trying to solve it locally between families in the traditional way."...
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Old 01-05-2012, 03:33 PM
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Exclamation Islamic 'Honor Violence' Rising in the West - 91% Committed by Muslims

Islamic 'Honor Violence' Rising in the West - 91% Committed by Muslims


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Old 01-06-2012, 09:30 PM
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Exclamation A Day in the Life of Sharia

A Day in the Life of Sharia
The savage and barbaric torture of Afghan women continues under Islamic law in Afghanistan
by Frank Crimi




In December 2011, Sahar Gul, a 15-year-old Afghan girl and underage bride, was freed by Afghan police after having been severely tortured for six months by her in-laws in an attempt to force her into prostitution. During her captivity, Sahar had been kept locked in a basement, tortured with hot irons, her fingers broken and fingernails ripped out.

While Sahar’s horrific ordeal sparked justifiable outrage among many Afghans, her agony is all too commonplace in Afghanistan, a country in which violence against women and girls is both pervasive and growing.

The violent abuse used against Afghan females also entails the widespread and socially accepted practice of forced child marriage, a cultural and religious reality that has led to over half of the marriages in Afghanistan involving girls under the age of 16.

So, given that, it’s not surprising to find that in the decade after the ouster of the Taliban from power in 2001, Afghanistan still remains one of the world’s most dangerous places for women. According to the UN’s Gender Inequality Index, Afghanistan ranks as the world’s sixth-worst country for women due to violence — including domestic abuse — sexual harassment, poverty and lack of healthcare.

Moreover, Afghan women and girls — in addition to underage marriage — are also subjected to honor killings and the traditional Afghan practice known as “baad,” whereupon women are given away to pay family debts or settle disputes.

Unfortunately — despite the rise of scores of women’s advocacy groups and the enactment of laws guaranteeing women’s rights — both the Afghan justice system and its patriarchal society remain heavily stacked against Afghan women and girls.

For example, in April 2009 Afghan President Hamid Karzai signed the Shiite Personal Status Law, legislation which applied to Afghanistan’s minority Shiite populace. Provisions in that legislation allowed 14-year-old girls to marry as well as men to rape their wives.After outcries by Afghan women’s groups that the government was legalizing marital rape, Karzai said the law would be amended to bring it in line with the Afghan constitution, which guarantees equal rights for women.

To that end, the Afghan government enacted later in 2009 the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW) law which criminalized acts like early or forced marriage and rape.

Despite its passage, however, a UN report in November 2011 found that the EVAW act was rarely enforced, citing as an example the 2,299 crimes reported in 2010, of which only 155 cases, or just 7 percent, were prosecuted.

According to the UN report, “Judicial officials in many parts of the country have begun to use the law — but its use represents a very small percentage of how the government addresses cases of violence against women.”

Of course, it’s not terribly surprising that given the treatment of women in Afghan society the response by Afghanistan’s police and judiciary is to either ignore crimes launched against women or, in most cases, send the women back to their abusers.

Nowhere has that latter point been better demonstrated than in the recent case of Gulnaz, a 19-year-old Afghan girl who was raped by her cousin’s husband and imprisoned in 2009 for “forced adultery.”

After spending two and a half years in jail, during which time she gave birth to a daughter fathered by her defiler, Gulnaz was offered a pardon in December 2011 by Afghan President Hamid Karzai on the condition Gulnaz marry her rapist.

While Karzai’s decision may have engendered outraged disbelief from those in the West its foundation was deeply rooted in Afghan custom and Islamic law. Specifically, Gulnaz’s little girl, having been born in prison, is considered to be illegitimate, a disgrace to her family and, as a consequence, never to be accepted by Afghan society unless her parents marry.

Yet, whether prompted by domestic pressures or by a need to polish Afghanistan’s international image, Karzai graciously released Gulnaz without the precondition she wed her rapist. In a bitter irony for Gulnaz, however, she has now traded the relative safety of the jail cell for a life on the run.

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Old 01-08-2012, 04:10 PM
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Exclamation Bangladesh 2011: 38 Women Set on Fire; 449 Others Killed Them-selves Under Repression

Bangladesh 2011:
38 Women Set on Fire; 449 Others Killed Them-selves Under Repression




As many as 449 women committed suicide facing different forms of repression last year, according to a report of a women's rights organisation published yesterday. Of them, 27 took their lives due to stalking.

Bangladesh Mahila Parishad made the annual report on women repression based on stories published in 14 national dailies last year, a press release said.

A total of 6,616 women fell victim to repression across the country last year, says the report. Of them, 1,014 women were victims of stalking, 96 were killed after rape and 38 died after being set on fire. Moreover, 81 women were acid burnt while two of them died following the attacks.

Over 800 women were raped, of whom 165 were gang raped, as per the report.

Two hundred and eighty seven women faced sexual harassment in 2011. About 181 women and teenage girls were abducted while 109 women and girl children fell victim to trafficking. Among the victims of trafficking, 45 were sold to brothels, the report says.

At least 330 women were killed for failing to give dowry while 55 teenage house helps died in different incidents of torture across the country. Also, 68 women were tortured in the name of fatwa (religious edict), and 75 fell victim to child marriage.

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The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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