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  #1  
Old 10-27-2007, 01:03 AM
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Exclamation Judaism 101

http://www.jewfaq.org/index.htm

I found this website to be a great help in gaining more insight into Judaism since my understanding is so limited.



Welcome


Welcome to Judaism 101! Judaism 101 is an online encyclopedia of Judaism, covering Jewish beliefs, people, places, things, language, scripture, holidays, practices and customs. My goal is to make freely available a wide variety of basic, general information about Judaism, written from a traditional perspective in plain English. This web site has grown continually for more than 10 years and continues to be updated periodically.

Everything in this web site is free to use or distribute in any way, with three conditions: 1) if you use text, graphics or sound from this site, please credit this site; 2) do not redistribute this information for profit; 3) do not "mirror" this site or copy pages from this site for use on other web sites. For further details, please see my copyright page.

The information in this site is written predominantly from the Orthodox viewpoint, because I believe that is the starting point for any inquiry into Judaism. As recently as 200 years ago, this was the only Judaism, and it still is the only Judaism in many parts of the world. Be aware, however, that many Jews do not follow all of the traditions described here, or in the precise form described here. The Conservative movement believes that these laws and traditions can change to suit the times, and Reform/Liberal/Progressive movements believe that individuals can make choices about what traditions to follow. However, what I present here is the starting point, the traditions that are being changed or chosen. On some pages, I have identified variations in practice or belief in other movements. About the Author


This site is created, written and maintained by Tracey Rich. I do not claim to be a rabbi or an expert on Judaism; I'm just a traditional, observant Jew who has put in a lot of research. I must be doing something right, because one of the rabbis at an "Ask a Rabbi" website routinely copies material from this website!

I work as a law librarian. I am also the co-author of several legal reference texts, including Pennsylvania Damages: Personal Injury Verdicts and Settlements. I am a member of Congregation Or Shalom, a Conservative synagogue in Chester County, PA.

Where to Start
There are over sixty web pages on this site, comprising over 200 pages of text, a virtual book of information on Judaism. That's a lot of information! Where should you start? That depends on what you're looking for: Just browsing? If you're not sure what you're looking for, and you just want to see what's available on this site, look through the Table of Contents. Looking for something specific? If you are looking for something specific, I have a Search Engine for this site. Enter a term and it will search the glossary and index, giving you quick definitions and explanations, and pointing you to appropriate pages in this site. Beginner, Intermediate or Advanced? Judaism 101 was originally created as an introduction to Judaism for people with little or no knowledge. But like the Passover seder, this site now includes information for the wise son, who wants to know the ritual details; the simple son, who asks simple questions; and the son who does not know what to ask (the wicked son can go someplace else <grin>). All pages are now labeled appropriately:

Basic: Things that every Jewish person should know, that require no prior knowledge
Intermediate: Beyond the basics
Advanced: More sophisticated concepts
Gentile: The minimal things that Jews expect gentiles to know. There is only one page in this category so far (about the holidays) but there may be one or two more in the future Want to see what's new? If you've been here before and just want to see what's new on the site, try the What's Nu? page, a chronological list of additions and significant changes to pages in this site.
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #2  
Old 12-25-2007, 05:24 AM
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Default Judaism

If you want to learn Judaism visit kolyakov.org and divineinformation.com great sites for Jews - both in English and Hebrew.

and its real Judaism- bringing Divine Proof- not just belief.- let me know how it went. Kol Tov.
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  #3  
Old 12-27-2007, 06:08 PM
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Thanks for the additional sites for learning.
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #4  
Old 02-16-2008, 08:22 PM
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Thanks for kolyakov.org

A
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  #5  
Old 02-19-2008, 04:19 PM
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Lightbulb Torah.net

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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #6  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:29 AM
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Lightbulb Judaism





"It has been estimated that one-third of our Western civilization bears the marks of its Jewish ancestry.... The real impact of the ancient Jews lies in the extent to which Western civilization took over their angle of vision on the deepest questions life poses."

-- Huston Smith,
The World's Religion

Judaism is one of the oldest religions still existing today. It began as the religion of the small nation of the Hebrews, and through thousands of years of suffering, persecution, dispersion, and occasional victory, has continued to be a profoundly influential religion and culture. Today, 14 million people identify themselves as Jewish. Modern Judaism is a complex phenomenon that incorporates both a nation and a religion, and often combines strict adherence to ritual laws with a more liberal attitude towards religious belief. Follow a link below to learn more about Judaism.

Judaism Basics Overview, Fast Facts, Glossary, Timeline

Jewish Beliefs 13 Articles of Faith, God, The Messiah, Human Nature, Afterlife

Jewish History Historical Context , Patriarchs, Moses and Sinai, Canaan and Judges, United Monarchy

Jewish Holidays The Jewish Calendar, Counting the Omer, Days of Awe , Hanukkah, Rosh Hashanah, Sabbath, Sukkot, Passover, Purim, Tu B'Shevat, Yom Kippur

Jewish Life Cycle Rituals Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Circumcision (Brit Milah) , Death , Divorce , Marriage, Mourning, Naming Ceremonies, Redemption of the Firstborn
Jewish Sects Conservative, Hasidic, Orthodox, Reform

Jewish People Martin Buber, Philo of Alexandria

Jewish Practices 613 Commandments, Keeping Kosher, Mitzvot, Rabbinic Law, Worship & Prayer

Jewish Texts Talmud, Tanakh, Torah (Law), Midrash, Responsa, Zohar

Jewish Things Kittel, Mezuzah, Synagogue, Tallit and Tzitzit , Tefillin (Phylacteries)


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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #7  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:33 AM
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Lightbulb Judaism

Judaism
Tanakh (Hebrew Bible)

The Tanakh is the Hebrew Bible, the quintessential sacred text. The first five books of this comprise the Torah (or Pentateuch), the core sacred writings of the ancient Jews, traditionally written by Moses under divine inspiration.
Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
Unicode with vowels.
Talmud and Mishna

The Babylonian Talmud
Translated by M.L. Rodkinson [1918]
A massive ten volume abridgement of the Talmud, the Jewish compendium of law and tradition, the only extensive public domain translation. Presented for the first time anywhere on the Internet at sacred-texts.com.
Eighteen Treatises from the Mishna
by D. A. Sola and M. J. Raphall [1843]
One of the first English translations of a substantial portion of the Mishna, the treasure-house of Jewish law and tradition.
The Wisdom of the Talmud
by Ben Zion Bokser [1878]
A great introduction to the Talmud for contemporary readers.
The Talmud
by Joseph Barclay [1878]
Seventeen representative tracts from the Talmud.
The Talmud: Selections
by H. Polano [1876]
A Talmud miscellany.
Sayings of the Jewish Fathers (Pirqe Aboth)
tr. by Charles Taylor [1897]
A beautiful extract from the Talmud, which has been used as liturgy. Devoted to ethics with some mystical touches, the Pirqe Aboth is distinguished for its transparency and simplicity. This was one of the first English translations in modern times of any portion of the Talmud.

Hebraic Literature
Edited by Maurice Harris [1901]
Extracts from the Talmud, Midrash and Kabbalah.

Tractate Sanhedrin, Mishnah and Tosefta
by Herbert Danby [1919]
A key portion of the Mishna dealing with crime and punishment.

Tractate Berakoth
by A. Lukyn Williams [1921]
The Mishna about prayer.

Haggada

Legends of the Jews
by Louis Ginzberg [1909].
A huge collection of traditional stories which have grown up around the Bible narrative.

Kabbalah


The Kabbalah Unveiled
S.L. MacGregor Mathers, Translator. [1912]
An extensive introduction to the Kabbalah. Translations of three texts from branch of the Kabbalah known as the Zohar:
The Book of Concealed Mystery
The Greater Holy Assembly
The Lesser Holy Assembly

Sepher Yezirah
translated by Isidor Kalisch [1877]
Includes English translation and pointed Hebrew for this key text of the Kabbalah.
Kabbalah - Sepher Yetzirah
W.W. Westcot tr. [1887] 26,374 bytes
The Zohar: Bere****h to Lekh Lekha
by Nurho de Manhar (pseud.) [1900-14]
The Zohar is a Kabbalistic commentary on the Hebrew Bible. This is the only extensive English translation of a portion of the Zohar currently in the public domain. Covers Adam to Abraham.

Jewish Mysticism
by J. Abelson [1913]
The Kabbalah in the context of the history of Jewish Mysticism.

The Kabbalah, or the Religious Philosophy of the Hebrews
by Adolphe Franck [1926]
Did the Kabbalah originate from Zoroastrianism?

The Cabala
by Bernhard Pick [1913]
A short critical introduction to the Kabbalah.
Midrash


Tales and Maxims from the Midrash
by Samuel Rapaport [1907]
A popular Midrash compilation. This is the (unattributed) source for the next two entries' Midrash extracts. This book has the references for each of the passages quoted lacking in the texts below, which makes it the best source if you wish to quote some of this material.
The Sacred Books and Early Literature of the East, Vol. IV: Medieval Hebrew
[1917]
Some sizeable extracts from the Midrash, medieval collections of Jewish Biblical lore and legend.
Midrash Tanhuma
60,529 bytes

Haggadah

The Union Haggadah
ed. by The Central Conference of American Rabbis, illus. Isidore Lipton [1923]
A guide to the celebration of Passover.
Haggada For Pesach According To Chabad-Lubavitch Custom 66,858 bytes
Other texts from late Antiquity and Middle Ages

The Works of Flavius Josephus
by Josephus, tr. by William Whiston [1737]
Josephus was a Jewish historian, soldier and scholar who lived in the first century [37-100 C.E.]. His works are primary historical sources of information about the doomed Jewish revolt of 66-9 C.E.
The Kitab al Khazari
of Judah Hallevi, translated by Hartwig Hirschfeld [1905]
A classic of Medieval Jewish philosophy, set in a legendary (but historical) central Asian kingdom.
The Guide for the Perplexed
by Moses Maimonides, M. Freidländer, tr. (2nd Ed.) [1904]
Maimonides' masterful summation of theology, natural philosophy and divine law.
Selected Religious Poems of Solomon ibn Gabirol
by Solomon ibn Gabirol, tr. by Israel Zangwill [1923]
A key medieval Jewish Spanish poet and philosopher's devotional poetry, some of which was adopted into liturgy.
The Fountain of Life
by Solomon ibn Gabirol, tr. by Harry E. Wedeck [1962]
An extract from the Jewish writer Solomon ibn Gabirol's philosophical treatise on the First Cause, misattributed for centuries to an Islamic or Christian author named Avicebron.
Original Hebrew of a Portion of Ecclesiasticus
by A.E. Cowley and A. Neubauer [1897]
Includes the Alphabet of Ben Sira.
Modern

Ancient Jewish Proverbs
by Abraham Cohen [1911]
A treasury of Jewish proverbs from the Mishna and Talmud.
Jewish Magic and Superstition: A Study in Folk Religion
by Joshua Trachtenberg [1939]
A comprehensive study of medieval Jewish folk magic, a primary source of modern ceremonial magic.
A Rabbi's Impressions of the Oberammergau Passion Play
by Joseph Krauskopf [1901]
A Rabbi examines the tangled narrative of the Crucifixion, and the roots of anti-Semitism in the early Church.
Folk-lore of the Holy Land; Moslem, Christian and Jewish
by J. E. Hanauer [1907]
Moslem, Christian and Jewish tales from old Palestine.
Jewish Fairy Tales and Legends by "Aunt Naomi" (Gertrude Landa) [1919]
A well-told collection of Midrash and Talmudic lore for children.
The Great March
by Rose G. Lurie [1931]
A wonderful children's book of post-biblical Jewish stories, with great illustrations, that adults can learn a thing or two from.

Reform Judaism - 1885 Pittsburgh Conference 4,588 bytes
Articles of Faith from the Jewish Encyclopedia 29,628 bytes
The Columbus Platform: The Guiding Principles Of Reform Judaism [1937] 8,706 bytes
Reform Judaism - A Centenary Perspective 11,054 bytes
Maimonides: Ani Maamin - I believe... 34,307 bytes
Solomon Schechter - Studies in Judaism - The Dogmas of Judaism 64,107 bytes
The Thirteen Wants by Mordecai M. Kaplan 2,127 bytes

Links

Jewish Virtual Library [External Site]
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #8  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:37 AM
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Judaism

Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. It is the first monotheistic religion, and is amongst the oldest of the world's religions. Universally known, it has influenced many aspects of Western civilization.

View at: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/...e/judaism.html
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #9  
Old 02-09-2009, 03:39 AM
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View this source material on Judaism at http://uwacadweb.uwyo.edu/religionet...aism/index.htm
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #10  
Old 02-11-2009, 04:57 AM
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Nice resources. I cheat though, when I have a question I ask my friend Keren.
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"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen."



Samuel Adams, at the Philadelphia State House, August 1, 1776
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Old 02-16-2009, 12:11 AM
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excellent links, just what I need.
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:23 PM
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Default % of non-Jews on site

Im sure its not tracked officially, but, do you have a sense of how many here are non-Jews? Just curious.

BTW, I have a BA (1973) in Middle Eastern History and Religion (Judaism) and spent my junior year at Tel Aviv University.18 credits in Hebrew and 3 in Yiddish.

My wife and I becoame Modern Orthodox as the kids arrived and went to day school, but, as the kids grew up and out we have become ethnic and "culinary Jews" (a term my wife coined .)

Im happy to field questions from my non-official perpsective.
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:47 PM
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The majority are non-Jews.
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O Israel
The LORD bless you and keep you;
The LORD make His face to shine upon you and be gracious to you;
The LORD lift up His countenance upon you and give you peace.

Asymmetric Warfare It’s not just for the “Other Guys”

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  #14  
Old 03-17-2009, 01:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitnadev View Post
Im sure its not tracked officially, but, do you have a sense of how many here are non-Jews? Just curious.
There is an unofficial, unscientific poll of this website under the link below.
http://israelmilitary.net/showthread.php?t=606

If you believe the numbers, roughly two thirds of the forum's members are non-Jews.
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Old 02-11-2010, 10:32 PM
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Smile The Torah Codes

The Torah Codes
For a religious Jew, it goes without saying that the Torah's origin is divine – we actually believe it was created by The Name as the blueprint for the creation of the Universe – therefore, the Torah existed before the Creation.
As such, it is a treasure cherished and studied by all Jewish generations since Moses received it from The Name at Mount Sinai.
At this forum we have people from all religions (well, most all…) and walks of life. While I do not intend or want to offend anyone, I cannot help but express a feeling I have that possibly most of the anti-semitism in the world is caused by some kind of envy at our condition of recipients and keepers of this light in the world. Please do not get me wrong, the Jewish people are not better than any other people on earth. What happens is that we are demanded to better ourselves and then (maybe) become "a light unto the nations". It is not an easy task. While the world is subject to the 7 Noahide laws to earn the afterlife – that is, to enjoy a spiritual communion with the Creator, the Jewish people has 613 laws to abide. As you can see, the "chosen people" thing is not easy at all…
Now, a Divine Blueprint is perfect by definition, and not subject to change, "perfecting" or any human-led update. This is what our Jewish faith tell us, and this is the reason why we have historically rejected both Xtian and Muslim attempts to 'convert' to their faiths and, returning to the beginning of this text, incurred in their wrath at our "stubbornness". I am sorry but, just as there is no such thing as a woman being "slightly pregnant", there is no way we Jews would settle for less than the full adherence to the Torah as it was revealed to us 3,500 years ago.
The Torah Codes
I am grateful to live in this time, when incredible discoveries are made possible by man's untamed curiosity, which leads to technological advancements that enable us to look further and deeper into the Creation (the Universe as we know it). The human intellect has enabled amazing conclusions based exclusively (or almost) on pure thinking. Our technological age allows for checking and 'fact-finding' researches which, when regarded without passion or sectarian views, only confirm the wisdom that permeates all around us.
Personally, I am humble enough to recognize that my mind is unable to grasp near-infinite figures, like the grains of sand in a beach, or the stars in the whole universe (of which our bafflingly humungous galaxy, the Milky Way, is but one among billions of other galaxies…). Therefore, for me there is no contradiction between calculations that date the Earth as 4,5 billion years old and the time declared by the Torah as the age of the Universe (6,5 thousand years). There is so much to know, that the concepts of "Day One" or "Billionth Year" are interchangeable, for all I (don't) know!
So, it is with amazement that I read Stephen Hawking describe the 3 First Minutes of the universe ("In The Beginning") and (I) recognize the first paragraph of Bere**** ("Genesis") in it. However, please bear in mind that this is a Jewish man thinking.
This brings me to the topic (thank you for your patience, if you are reading until here!), the Torah codes.
Jewish sages have been studying this subject, using the knowledge referred to as the Oral Torah (a set of teachings received by Moses at the same time as the Written Torah, and passed down generation after generation for 3,500 years, first orally, and then in written, after the debacle of 70 C.E., when the second temple was destroyed and our people scattered in the Diaspora), which also includes a 'method' called Gematria (the basis of Kabala, erroneously referred by Madonna and her Los Angeles 'mentors' as "not a Jewish science, but rather an ancient knowledge shared by Egyptian pharaos and others", in the familiar post-modernist effort to delegitimize the Jewish culture and influence in the world culture). Below you have just a sample of what can be studied in depth at http://www.vilnagaon.org/book/largebo.htm , explaining how a relentless internal logic confirms the intentional structure in which the Torah was created, and reveals facts from Human History in a disconcerting way – however only and always in hindsight, because our free will (The Name's biggest gift to mankind) can always change what "was already written". The method to uncover this code is called Equal Interval Reading, and it goes way beyond what skeptics call "coincidence". I hope you find the reading interesting – and revealing!
What is Equal Interval Reading?

Let us eliminate the spaces between the words of the Torah (the Five Books of Moses) and consider the text as a sequence of letters. Now, starting from a certain letter, let us skip N-1 letters and read the N-th one, then again skip N-1 letters and read the N-th one, and so on. This will be called a reading with the interval N, The number N may also be negative, in which case the reading is backwards, Of course, besides the interval N one has to know where to start counting and how many intervals to go.

Figure 1

The Letters of Genesis Chapter 1:1 to Genesis 1:5
Torah/תורה
See the side of the chart to find the various locations of the above word in code.
1
ב
2
ר
3
א
4
ש
5
י
6
ת
7
ב
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ר
9
א
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א
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ל
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ה
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י
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ם
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א
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ת
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ה
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ש
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מ
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י
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ם
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ו
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א
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ת
25
ה
line
1
תורה
starting at letter 6
interval of +50
26
א
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ר
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ץ
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ו
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ה
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א
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ר
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ץ
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ה
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י
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ת
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ת
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ב
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ש
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ך
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ע
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ל
line
2
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נ
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ת
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ם
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ר
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ח
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ה
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י
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ם
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מ
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ר
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ח
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פ
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ת
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ע
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ל
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פ
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נ
line
3
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י
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ה
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מ
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ם
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י
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א
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מ
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א
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ל
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י
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ם
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י
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ה
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י
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א
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ר
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י
line
4
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א
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ו
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ר
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ו
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י
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ר
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א
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א
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ל
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ה
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י
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ם
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א
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ת
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ה
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א
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ו
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ר
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כ
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י
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ט
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ו
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ב
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ו
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י
line
5
126
ב
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ד
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ל
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א
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ל
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ה
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י
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ם
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ב
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י
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ן
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ה
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ר
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ב
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ן
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ח
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י
line
6
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ק
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ר
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א
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א
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ל
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ה
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י
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ם
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ל
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א
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line
7
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ל
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ע
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ב
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The Translation of the Hebrew Text Cited Above
GENESIS CHAPTER 1

1. In the beginning G-d created the heaven and the earth. 2. Now the earth was unformed and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of G-d hovered over the face of the waters. 3. And G-d said: 'Let there be light.' And there was light. 4. And G-d saw the light, that it was good,' and G-d divided the light from the darkness .And G-d called the light 'Day', and the darkness He called 'Night'.

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Old 02-11-2010, 10:36 PM
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I am sorry, the formatting of the Hebrew letters was lost in my post. Please refer to the link informed to see how evenly the words of the word "Torah" appear in the first chapters of the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th books of the Tanach (the five books of Moshe), and much, much more.
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Old 07-18-2010, 10:00 PM
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http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/cont...ule_detail.asp

July 16, 2010

The Other Talmud

By Yehudah Mirsky



A Jewish classic known as much for its obscurity as for its great significance took another step into the light this spring with the online publication of its oldest and most reliable version. The classic is the Jerusalem Talmud, and the version is a parchment manuscript, known as the Leiden manuscript, written in 1289 by a Jewish scholar and copyist in Rome.


Historically a step-sister to the larger and vastly more influential Babylonian Talmud, the Yerushalmi (to use its Hebrew name), composed in the 3rd and 4th centuries C.E., still fires imaginations. Despite its traditional designation, it was written not in Jerusalem but in the Galilee, and is thus often referred to in ancient sources as the Talmud of the Land of Israel and in scholarly literature as the Palestinian Talmud.

In the 5th century, anti-Semitism, economic travail, and the abolition by the Byzantines of the Jewish patriarchate put an end to the scholarly activity recorded in the Yerushalmi, and the center of rabbinic authority shifted eastward to the great academies of Babylon. There, generations of editors and redactors would rework myriad oral traditions and records of lectures and disputations into the polished if voluminous and complicated text of the Babylonian Talmud (the "Bavli"). By contrast, the Yerushalmi presents its texts and traditions tersely, betraying much less editing and conceptual rigging than the Bavli. This more stenographic presentation can make for more difficult but also thrilling reading.
The Yerushalmi never went entirely into eclipse. It was studied and used in Italian centers of learning that in turn influenced the foundations of Ashkenazic Jewry. It also continued to leave its traces in halakhic literature, particularly on matters where the Bavli was ambiguous or silent. Its abundance of non-legal, midrashic material also found a place in texts and collections.
First printed in the 1520s by Daniel Bomberg, the Yerushalmi sparked renewed interest in the 18th century when the Gaon of Vilna called for enriching the Bavli-centric rabbinic curriculum with its teachings. Although little studied in 19th-century yeshivas, it was seized upon by modern scholars seeking a richer historical understanding and by writers and polemicists for whom its very existence suggested a more dynamic conception of rabbinic origins. Religious Zionists, for their part, valued the Yerushalmi not only for its discussions of the significance of the Land of Israel but also out of the hope that this connection to the land, along with the Yerushalmi's raw and unfinished character, might offer a more primal and invigorated source of religious law.
Modern academic scholarship on the Yerushalmi is heavily indebted to Saul Lieberman, perhaps the greatest talmudist of the 20th century and the work's undoubted master. His student Yaacov Zusman supervised the publication of the Leiden manuscript in 2001, and Zusman's student Leib Moscovitz has published a guide to the Yerushalmi's obscure terminology. Still another Lieberman student, David Rosenthal, discovered last year a hitherto unknown passage from the Yerushalmi at the University of Geneva.
Other scholars, notably Peter Schäfer of Princeton, have studied the Yerushalmi in its wider historical and cultural contexts. In the meantime, the work is also making popular inroads with the appearance of a new translation into modern Hebrew, the first volumes of an English translation by ArtScroll, and a proliferation of websites and educational materials.
In all, the revival of interest in the Yerushalmi is yet another manifestation of the great contemporary resurgence in Jewish learning. Fragmentary, obscure, overshadowed (likely forever) by the Bavli, the Yerushalmi opens a precious window onto the ancient workshops that created the extraordinary world of rabbinic Judaism.






You can find this online at: http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/cont...e-other-talmud
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Old 09-15-2010, 07:59 AM
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http://www.aish.com/print/?contentID...ction=/h/hh/yk

ABC's of Yom Kippur
by Rabbi Shraga Simmons Guidelines for the holiest day of the Jewish year -- the Day of Atonement.



On Yom Kippur, every Jew becomes like an angel. What are "angels?" Angels are completely spiritual beings, whose sole focus is to serve their Creator. The Maharal of Prague explains:
"All of the mitzvot that God commanded us on [Yom Kippur] are designed to remove, as much as possible, a person's relationship to physicality, until he is completely like an angel."
Just as angels (so to speak) stand upright, so too we spend most of Yom Kippur standing in the synagogue. And just as angels (so to speak) wear white, so too we are accustomed to wear white on Yom Kippur. Just as angels do not eat or drink, so too, we do not eat or drink.
This idea even has a practical application in Jewish law: typically, the second verse of the Shema, Baruch Shem, is recited quietly. But on Yom Kippur, it is proclaimed out loud -- just like the angels do.


There are five areas of physical involvement from which we remove ourselves on Yom Kippur:
  1. Eating and drinking
  2. Washing
  3. Applying oils or lotions to the skin
  4. Marital relations
  5. Wearing leather shoes
Throughout the year, many people spend their days focusing on food, work, material possessions (symbolized by shoes) and superficial pleasures (symbolized by anointing). On Yom Kippur, we restore our priorities to what really counts in life.
As Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler writes:
"On Yom Kippur, the power of the [physical] inclination is muted. Therefore, one's yearning for spiritual elevation reasserts itself, after having lain dormant as a result of sin's deadening effect on the soul. This rejuvenation of purpose entitles a person to special consideration and forgiveness."
Structure of the Day
The Talmud says that on Rosh Hashana, the Books of Life and Death are open and God writes who will be granted another year of life. For many, this decision hangs in the balance for 19 days until Yom Kippur, when the final decision is sealed. The prayers of Yom Kippur are designed to stir us to mend our ways. Some highlights:
• The Yom Kippur prayers begin before sundown with the haunting melody of Kol Nidrei. The Torah scrolls are all removed from the Ark, and the chazzan (cantor) chants the Kol Nidrei prayer three times, each with greater intensity.

• The special Yom Kippur Amidah (standing prayer) incorporates the Al-Chet confession of our various mistakes. With each mention of a mistake, we lightly beat our chest with the fist – as if to say that it is our impulses that got the best of us.

• The Yizkor service – said in memory of loved ones – is recited following the morning Torah reading.

• The lengthy Mussaf service features a recounting of the Yom Kippur service in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. A highlight was the High Priest entering the Holy of Holies – the only person to do so, this one time a year. The Mussaf service also records how the High Priest would pronounce God's holy name, and in response the assembled Jews would prostrate on the ground. When reaching these passages, we too prostrate ourselves on our hands and knees.

• At the Mincha service, we read the Book of Jonah, the biblical story of a prophet who tried to “flee from God” and wound up swallowed into the belly of a huge fish.

• While a regular weekday has three prayer services, and Shabbat and holidays have four, Yom Kippur is the only day of the year that has five. This final prayer is called Ne’ilah, literally the “closing of the gates,” which serves as the final chance to ensure that our decree for the year is “sealed” in the Book of Life. At the conclusion of Ne’ilah, the shofar is sounded – one long blast, signifying our confidence in having passed the High Holidays with a good judgment.


The Yom Kippur fast begins at sundown, and extends 25 hours until the following nightfall.
The afternoon before Yom Kippur, it is a special mitzvah to eat a festive meal.
As far as making your fast easier, try to pace your intake throughout the previous day by eating something every two hours. Watermelon and grape juice are helpful before a fast.
At the festive meal itself, eat a moderate portion of food so as not to speed up the digestion process. Also, don't drink any coffee or coke, because caffeine is a diuretic. Heavy coffee drinkers can also avoid the dreaded headache by slowly reducing the amount of consumption over the week leading up to Yom Kippur.
After a meal we generally get thirstier, so when you complete the festive meal, leave some extra time before sundown to drink. Also, drinking lukewarm water with some sugar can help make you less thirsty during the fast.


If someone is ill, and a doctor is of the opinion that fasting might pose a life-danger, then the patient should eat or drink small amounts.
The patient should try to eat only about 30 ml (one fluid ounce) and wait nine minutes before eating again. Once nine minutes have passed, one can eat this small amount again, and so on throughout the day.
With drinking, he should try to drink less than what the Talmud calls "melo lugmav" -- the amount that would fill a person's puffed-out cheek. While this amount will vary from person to person, it is approximately 35 ml (just over one fluid ounce) and one should wait nine minutes before drinking again.
How does consuming small amounts make a difference? In Jewish law, an act of "eating" is defined as "consuming a certain quantity within a certain period of time." Otherwise, it's not eating, it's "nibbling" -- which although prohibited on Yom Kippur, there is room to be lenient when one's health is at stake.
The reason for all these technicalities is because eating on Yom Kippur is regarded as one of the most serious prohibitions in the Torah. So while there are leniencies in certain situations, we still try to minimize it.
Note that eating and drinking are treated as independent acts, meaning that the patient can eat and drink together during those nine minutes, and the amounts are not combined.
Having said all this, if these small amounts prove insufficient to prevent the health danger, the patient may even eat and drink regularly. In such a case, a person does not say Kiddush before eating, but does recite "Grace After Meals," inserting the "ya'aleh veyavo" paragraph.
Now what about a case where the patient's opinion conflicts with that of the doctor? If the patient is certain he needs to eat to prevent a danger to health, then we rely on his word, even if the doctor disagrees. And in the opposite scenario -- if the patient refuses to eat despite doctors' warnings -- then we persuade the patient to eat, since it is possible that his judgment is impaired due to illness.
Wishing you an easy fast and a meaningful Yom Kippur!
In Case of Illness
The Fast Itself
Five Aspects
Following the sin of the Golden Calf, Moses pleaded with God to forgive the people. Finally on Yom Kippur, atonement was achieved and Moses brought the second set of Tablets down from Mount Sinai.
From that day forward, every Yom Kippur carries with it a special power to cleanse our mistakes (both individually and collectively) and to wipe the slate clean.

This works on two conditions:

1) We do a process called teshuva -- literally "return." The process of teshuva involves four steps:

• Regret – acknowledging that a mistake was made, and feeling regret at having squandered some of our potential.

• Cessation – Talk is cheap, but stopping the harmful action shows a true commitment to change.

• Confession – To make it more “real,” we admit our mistake verbally, and ask forgiveness from anyone we may have harmed.

• Resolution – We make a firm commitment not to repeat the harmful action in the future.

2) Though the combination of teshuva and Yom Kippur atones for transgressions against God, it does not automatically erase wrongs committed against other people. It is therefore the universal Jewish custom -- some time before Yom Kippur -- to apologize and seek forgiveness from any friend, relative, or acquaintance whom we may have harmed or insulted over the past year.
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Old 03-24-2014, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by air-on View Post

The method to uncover this code is called Equal Interval Reading, and it goes way beyond what skeptics call "coincidence". I hope you find the reading interesting – and revealing!
The reading is interesting. But is the other method also. Similar to PaRDeS. It is possible to read The Torah Codes without Equal Interval. But with anagram, intuition and special moving of eyes. By such way the verses of Job 22 say about mummification. And about secret map. And how to find the covered with sand opening.
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