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Air Force Forum Israeli Air force topics, missions and history + air forces from other nations.

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  #1  
Old 05-01-2010, 04:22 PM
UrielG UrielG is offline
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Cool joining the IAF

Hi.
I am 18, jewish and british, want to make Aliyah and have always wanted to be a pilot.
I have also been flying before.
I was wondering if it is possible for me to joint he IAF in a flying
position?
Many thanks for a great forum. This is my first post.
Uriel
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  #2  
Old 05-02-2010, 07:07 AM
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rafi rafi is offline
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Welcome to the forum.

The short answer is no. I am sure you are aware of the tremendous competition to even get into consideration for the program.

How is your hebrew? Obviously you should be fluent enough to discuss aerodynamics in Hebrew, and be an expert in the subject matter.

I would expect you to be in the top five of your graduating class, as most candidates are. President of a club or two, and mostly likely Captain of your football team or whatever sports you competed in. Think of the competition for flight school as making consideration for becoming a Rhodes Scholar easy. You certainly have a better shot at becoming one than getting through a pilot program.

There are numerous challenges regarding pilots and citizenship requirements, but you can worry about that when the time comes.

Lastly, the IAF is the one branch of the entire IDF that you cannot get into by request. You can only be chosen to serve in it.

So while the goal is noble, the reality is that most likely you will not become a pilot for the IAF.

But there are many many great ways to serve. And so many groups in the UK who can help you.
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  #3  
Old 05-03-2010, 11:48 PM
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ishmael ishmael is offline
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When i read about selectivity i am happy father teach me to know how many falestini walk by this stone six hours past! Do not be discouraged, a person is only limited by his will to try. You may not know what you are best doing until you are shown. :)
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Old 06-23-2011, 01:48 PM
jojo.meyers jojo.meyers is offline
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Shalom,

I am an American 16 year old, and I too, have dreamt of becoming an Israeli pilot since I was young. I am quite familiar with the selection process for Israelis to become pilots, however, for obvious reasons, the process cannot be the same for immigrants who have similar aspirations.

A friend of my family who immigrated to Israel after high school and spent a year perfecting his Hebrew actually got invited to the Gibbush Tayas. I know this guy personally and know for a fact that while he is intelligent, his grades were not the best; and yet he was still invited. He declined the invitation and is currently serving in Nachal.

How would you explain that? Also, I'm curious as to your analysis of his chances of success in becoming a pilot had he hypothetically accepted, and successfully completed the Gibbush, now that you are aware of his circumstances.

After doing some research I can only speculate that his special status of being a Chayal Boded might have something to do with the invitation. Could that be the case? And if so what would that imply?

I would very greatly appreciate your analysis.

Yoni
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  #5  
Old 06-24-2011, 03:36 AM
haamimhagolan haamimhagolan is offline
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In case you were not aware Yoni, Rafi has served in the IDFAF, although not as a pilot. When he writes about how difficult it is to get in, he knows what he is talking about.

None of us can speak to the specific circumstances of a particular individual, nor will the IDF comment on their selection process. Being a Chayal Boded is not going to make him more likely to be selected. If anything the opposite, since he is an unknown quantity that no one who has already served in the air force can vouch for. As for the success rate of anyone who actually is admitted to pilot training, you shouldn't have to ask any of us that. The wash out rate is legendary.
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  #6  
Old 06-24-2011, 11:38 AM
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scelli scelli is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haamimhagolan View Post
In case you were not aware Yoni, Rafi has served in the IDFAF, although not as a pilot. When he writes about how difficult it is to get in, he knows what he is talking about.
He most certainly should be aware, as a previous thread back in 2009 clearly shows:

http://www.israelmilitary.net/showpo...20&postcount=2

Whether this particular poster wishes to heed the advice of experience and stow away his fantasies is another matter entirely.
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  #7  
Old 06-24-2011, 12:25 PM
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rafi rafi is offline
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While not rushing to discuss myself, I think I had a few things going for me that the IAF was interested in, the most important of which I had no control over.

So, after growing up in America, I was selected for the IAF in the early 1970s. I was at Columbia Univrsity at the time, so, yes, I was successful in school. After fifteen plus years of Hebrew School, Hebrew High School and college level courses taught in hebrew in New York, I made aliyah.
So all exams, interviews, negotiations were completed in hebrew. Also,
during my time at Columbia, I worked at the Jewish Agency, and had solid relations with people of influence who were great mentors.

Despite all that, the most compelling and attractive item in my portfolio was my mother and father. OK, not them exactly. But the fact that through some quirk of genetics I had better than 20/10 vision. That put me like three of four full standard deviation points to the right on the graph of vision worldwide. (standard deviation points? look it up).

And finally, I was left handed, which was a major advantage for certain airborn weapon systems at that time. Again, Mom and Dad more than me.

I have no doubt that you personally know someone who was invited to the process. Well, was invited to start the process. But it is telling this makes now two honest to goodness confirmed accountings of olim who got invited into the IAF (and still only one who served) . Yes, there are many many more, but again, as a a random sample of people interested in the IAF, in all the years of this board we can still count on one hand all there were.

While I am certain your friends accounting is accurate, it would be highly unusual for the IAF to invite someone to try out, but not to do anything to protect that headcount as someone they would want to serve in another capacity within the IAF branch. Headcount is the most valuable quantity in the military. Headcount with brains - even rarer.

And to end up in infantry from a Tayas tryout, he must have killed someone by accident (only kidding).

All that being said, go for it!! But keep a realistic set of expectations
of where you will end up and how you will bestserve the people and the image of yourself you trying to become.
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  #8  
Old 06-24-2011, 01:29 PM
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And finally, I was left handed, which was a major advantage for certain airborn weapon systems at that time. Again, Mom and Dad more than me.
The only thing being left-handed in the service ever got me was the necessity of securing the top button of my utility shirt (just great in extreme heat and humidity, by the way...) when firing an M-16 on practice/qualifying ranges. If you didn't do that, a person ended up with a lot of very hot expelled brass from the ejection port down his chest. And I happened to have had (and still have in fact) a very hairy chest.
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Old 06-24-2011, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scelli View Post
The only thing being left-handed in the service ever got me was the necessity of securing the top button of my utility shirt (just great in extreme heat and humidity, by the way...) when firing an M-16 on practice/qualifying ranges. If you didn't do that, a person ended up with a lot of very hot expelled brass from the ejection port down his chest. And I happened to have had (and still have in fact) a very hairy chest.
Talk about a subject that you either were there or not, I have burn mark scars to this day. And the smell of burning hair on a rifle range is forever linked in my mind.

Not positive why, but Israel is exceptional in developing ambidextrious personal weapons, dating all the way back to the Uzi.

To this day my kids are more horrified of inheriting my hairy back than they are afraid fo going bald. wimps.
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Old 06-24-2011, 04:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rafi View Post
Talk about a subject that you either were there or not, I have burn mark scars to this day. And the smell of burning hair on a rifle range is forever linked in my mind.

Not positive why, but Israel is exceptional in developing ambidextrious personal weapons, dating all the way back to the Uzi.

To this day my kids are more horrified of inheriting my hairy back than they are afraid fo going bald. wimps.
Whiffing even the faintest trace of cordite (or something similarly smelling) gives me instant flashbacks to those hot, dusty rifle ranges in recruit training. That really shouldn't be because I pulled enough firing range NCOIC duty during my many years on active duty where I wasn't the one under pressure to qualify, but it continues to occur even 30 years after separation. Another thing is passing by a dumpster with discarded food: Instantly reminds me too much of the mess hall along with the pain of mess duty in having to clean out grease traps and the like.
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